Laurent Bossavit

Laurent Bossavit is mainly known as an Agilist and was a recipient of the 2006 Gordon Pask award from that community.

He is, however, a firm believer in belonging to many tribes and traveling far and wide (intellectually and physically) to engage in the trade of that most precious commodity: useful ideas.

He still likes to code though no longer doing so full-time; as of 2015 he has joined the State Startups initiative, part of the French Prime Minister's Modernization Programme.

His hobbies include slaying software engineering Leprechauns and debugging his own brain.




NewCrafts 2018

It’s Chimerae All The Way Down !

  • Quick hands-on
  • Life
  • Agile
  • People

Do you identify as a developer, a coach, a Product Owner, a Scrum Master ? This workshop aims to deconstruct these and other labels, and prompt deeper thinking about the roles we take on at work. Introspection can be difficult, but the process is designed to ensure your safety, and the reward is self-knowledge: a clearer view of the resources that you contribute to your professional community. The value of this session will be magnified by the diversity of its participants: please consider attending especially if you feel unsure of your place in this community or at work.


Room: Backus - Time: 5/18/2018 1:45:00 PM

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NewCrafts 2017

Perpetual Infancy - why software doesn't seem to be growing up

  • Talk
  • Life
  • Agile
  • Craftsmanship

About the need of history in software ...


Room: Lovelace - Time: 5/19/2017 9:45:00 AM

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NewCrafts 2016

Rise of the Digital Hussars?

  • Lightening
  • Life
  • Agile
  • Craftsmanship

Are you yearning to write software that really matters to your users, software that does more than line corporate pockets and all too often turn into soul-grinding work? If that is what software craftsmanship means to you, I have an unusual proposition - work for the French government.

For most of you, government innovation probably sounds like an oxymoron. At best the words sound like an incongruous combination, like fish and chocolate. In the 2010 O'Reilly book Open Government Matthew Burton wrote: 'In recent years, the government has become almost completely dependent upon contractors for information technology (IT). So deep is this dependency that the government has found itself in a position that may shock those in the tech industry: it has no programmers of its own; code is almost entirely outsourced. (...) On top of keeping the government from innovating, the dependence on contractors hurts the country in much more tangible ways.'

This was written about the US government but applies equally well to France. Burton went on that the most skilled developers could be persuaded, out of a sense of civic aspiration, to lend governments these skills for a tour of duty. France, it turns out, is one of the countries to have recognized this as a great idea: we call it the State Startups, in French Startups d'Etat.

That may sound like yet another oxymoron. This talk is to convince you, in a short time so as not to risk boring anyone, that fish actually tastes good with chocolate - to entice you to try your hand at being a digital Hussar.


Room: Gallia - Time: 5/13/2016 11:45:00 AM

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newcrafts2015

The Joy of Debugging Ourselves

  • Talk
  • Life
  • Agile
  • Craftsmanship

Here's a guilty secret of programming: a little debugging is a lot of fun. Granted, too much debugging can be the opposite of fun. Therein lies a mystery: why can't we ever seem to write just the right amount of bugs? The discipline tasked with answering these questions, known as Software Engineering has for the past four decades (and a bit) managed to ignore some fundamental facts about programming, such as why a little debugging can be a lot of fun, and more interestingly where bugs come from in the first place. Laurent's talk reveals some dismal truths about this sad state of affairs, but also offers more uplifting suggestions on how we can bring tons of fun back into programming, by developing new skills such as leprechaun hunting and brain debugging.


Room: Main - Time: 5/13/2015 9:30:00 AM

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DiversityCharter
Code of conduct

Our conference is dedicated to providing a harassment-free conference experience for everyone, regardless of gender, gender identity and expression, age, sexual orientation, disability, physical appearance, body size, race, or religion (or lack thereof). We do not tolerate harassment of conference participants in any form. Sexual language and imagery is not appropriate for any conference venue, including talks, workshops, parties, Twitter and other online media. Conference participants violating these rules may be sanctioned or expelled from the conference without a refund at the discretion of the conference organisers.